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The effect of dietary xylanase on energy, amino acid and mineral metabolism and egg production and quality in laying hens.

The aim of this study was to examine the effect of dietary xylanase on the availability of nutrients for laying hens when fed on wheat–rye–soy-based diets.

Year of Publication2010

1. The aim was to examine the effect of dietary xylanase on the availability of nutrients for laying hens when fed on wheat–rye–soy-based diets. The basal diet was formulated to contain 11•03 MJ/kg apparent metabolisable energy (AME), and the experimental diets were formulated by supplementing the basal diet with four different activities of xylanase (400, 800, 1200 and 1600 xylanase units (XU)/kg). 2. The AME and nitrogen metabolisability coefficients of xylanase-supplemented diets were 1•2% and 7•1%, respectively, greater than in the control diet. 3. Supplementary xylanase significantly improved the coefficients of metabolisability of indispensable, dispensable and total amino acids by 8•2%, 6•9% and 7•8%, respectively, and led to a significantly linear response of total amino acid metabolisability coefficient to xylanase. There was a range of effects within the indispensable amino acids with xylanase supplementation (1600 XU/kg) significantly improving the metabolisability of threonine by 4•9%, but having no have effect on lysine. The response of total amino acid retention to added xylanase was a significant quadratic function and suggests that 800 XU/kg is the optimum supplementary dosage. 4. Supplementary xylanase significantly improved sulphur metabolisability in a linear fashion to a maximum of 2•3% higher than that of the control diet. In terms of daily retention, most of the minerals responded in a quadratic manner to dietary xylanase, as the suggested optimal supplementary level was between 800 and 1200 XU/kg. 5. The yolk colour of the birds receiving 1200 and 1600 XU/kg was 0•33 and 0•28 units (Roche score); these were 4•1% and 3•5%, respectively, darker than the yolk of the birds given the control diet. 6. Birds receiving xylanase had a significantly higher weight gain than those fed on the unsupplemented diet. Feed intake, the number of eggs per hen per d, dirty and cracked eggs, and feed conversion ratio for egg production were not affected by xylanase. These data suggest that use of a xylanase may improve the metabolisability of many nutrients, but that such effects may not always benefit production parameters.

Citation

Pirgozliev, V.; Bedford, M. R.; Acamovic, T. (2010) "The effect of dietary xylanase on energy, amino acid and mineral metabolism and egg production and quality in laying hens."British Poultry Science 51 (5) pp 639-647

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Supporting the development of the national rural economy.

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