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The role of acetaldehyde and glycerol in the adaptation to ethanol stress of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other yeasts

This study investigated the potential ameliorating effect of acetaldehyde on a wide range of ethanol-stressed yeasts

Year of Publication2009

Ethanol inhibition is a commonly encountered stress condition during typical yeast fermentations and often results in reduced fermentation rates and production yields. While past studies have shown that acetaldehyde addition has a significant ameliorating effect on the growth of ethanol-stressed Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this study investigated the potential ameliorating effect of acetaldehyde on a wide range of ethanol-stressed yeasts. Acetaldehyde does not appear to be a universal ameliorating agent for yeasts exposed to ethanol stress. It is also shown that as a result of an ethanol stress, most yeasts rapidly produce glycerol as an alternative means of NAD(+) regeneration rather than having a specific requirement for glycerol. The results strongly suggest that both ethanol and acetaldehyde exposure have a direct effect on the cellular NAD(+)/NADH ratio, which can manifest itself as modulations in glycerol production.

Citation

Vriesekoop F.; Haass C.; Pamment N. B. (2009) "The role of acetaldehyde and glycerol in the adaptation to ethanol stress of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other yeasts"FEMS Yeast Research 9 (3) pp 365-371

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Additional keywords/tags

redoxyeastglycerolacetaldehydeethanol stress
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Supporting the development of the national rural economy.

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