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Effect of genotype, environment and agronomic management on b-glucan concentration of naked barley grain intended for human health food use.

Study of the effects of genotype, environment and agronomy on beta-glucan concentration in barley.

Year of Publication2011

(1,3:1,4)-beta-D-Glucan is an important bioactive that contributes to the ability of barley foods to help prevent type-2 diabetes. Realisation of these benefits requires understanding of genotype and environment effects on beta-glucan concentration and how this variation affects biological activity of barley foods. Field experiments showed genetic variation in beta-glucan concentration (3.0-7.0 g/100 g DM), but also considerable variation between environments. beta-Glucan concentrations were lower in the wet summer of 2007 than 2006 or 2009; and slightly less in the dry summer of 2006 than 2009. beta-Glucan was not diluted by higher grain yields. The role of beta-glucan as an assimilate buffer adds complexity to interpreting the effects of environment during grain filling. Autumn sowing and fungicide increased the duration of grain filling, decreased beta-glucan concentration but increased environmental stability; possibly due to lower demand for assimilate buffering. Lodging and foliar disease decreased beta-glucan concentration, by decreasing assimilate supply leading to remobilisation of carbohydrate from beta-glucan, so that fungicide increased beta-glucan in some disease-susceptible accessions. Sequential harvesting starting at GS 91 suggested an optimum harvest window for maximum beta-glucan concentration. The variability in beta-glucan reported here between genotypes and environments was sufficient to affect control of post-prandial blood glucose in healthy volunteers.

Citation

Dickin, E. T.; Steele, K. A.; Frost, G.; Edwards-Jones, G.; Wright, D. (2011) "Effect of genotype, environment and agronomic management on b-glucan concentration of naked barley grain intended for human health food use."Journal of Cereal Science 54 (1) pp 44-52

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Additional keywords/tags

geneendospermhordeum vulgaresynthasemalting qualitybiosynthesis1 3 1 4 beta d glucanscell wallscultivarcereal
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Supporting the development of the national rural economy.

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