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The compatibility of the fungicide azoxystrobin with Pochonia chlamydosporia, a biological control agent for potato cyst nematodes (Globodera spp.)

Report of a series of experiments to determine the compatibility of the fungus which exerts biological control of nematodes with modern fungicides.

Year of Publication2008

The biological control potential of Pochonia chlamydosporia against root-knot (Meloidogyne spp.) and cyst-forming (Heterodera and Globodera spp.) nematodes is widely appreciated. In spite of this, little has been undertaken to determine the compatibility of this fungus with modern fungicides. A series of experiments were undertaken to investigate the effect of azoxystrobin on P. chlamydosporia. Initial Petri dish experiments found a significant reduction in the growth of P. chlamydosporia. EC50 values were calculated at 7 and 14 mg L−1, respectively, for hyphal growth and chlamydospore germination. A microcosm experiment based on counts of the colony-forming units of the re-isolated fungus showed a reduction in EC50 values for azoxystrobin in soil after 12, 20 and 40 days incubation (1.25, 1.00 and 3.00 mg kg−1 soil, respectively). There was evidence the fungus recovered over time in response to azoxystrobin application. This was also demonstrated in a glasshouse experiment where EC50 values of 1.32 and 4.4 mg kg−1 soil were obtained for 35 and 49 days after planting (DAP), respectively.

Citation

Tobin, J D; Haydock P P J; Hare, M C; Woods, S R; Crump, D H (2008) "The compatibility of the fungicide azoxystrobin with Pochonia chlamydosporia, a biological control agent for potato cyst nematodes (Globodera spp.)"Annals of Applied Biology 152 (3) pp 301 - 305

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Supporting the development of the national rural economy.

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